Stinking passion flower

Native to South America, stinking passionflower is a climbing vine with an unpleasant smell and flowers that resemble those of the passionfruit vine.

Stinking passionflower can invade forest edges, coastal vegetation, roadsides and disturbed areas. It is widespread in northern Queensland.

Stinking passion flower is not a prohibited or restricted invasive plant under the Biosecurity Act 2014.

Scientific name

Passiflora foetida

Description

  • Climbing vine densely covered in soft, sometimes sticky, hairs.
  • Leaves are 3-10cm long, with 3-5 pointed lobes.
  • Flowers are 3-5cm wide, with cream petals and white, pink or purple centres, similar to blooms of passionfruit vine.
  • Fruits are dry orange berries, 1-3cm wide, enclosed in prickly outer leaves.
  • Stems have an unpleasant smell.

Habitat

  • Found along banks of rivers and creeks, on roadsides, and in crops, pastures, coastal vegetation, and disturbed areas.

Distribution

  • Widespread in north Queensland, less common in South East Queensland.

Life cycle

  • Flowers February-November.

Affected animals

  • Humans
  • livestock

Impacts

Environmental

  • Invades forest edges, coastal vegetation, roadsides and disturbed areas.
  • Has ability to increase current distribution, spreading into other natural areas and becoming more invasive.

Economic

  • Poisonous to livestock.

Social

  • Poisonous to humans.

How it is spread

  • Seeds are spread by birds and bats.

Control

Physical control

  • Hand-pull vines when soil is moist.

Herbicide control

See the Stinking passion flower fact sheet (PDF, 599KB) for herbicide control and application rates.

Biological control

  • No known biological control agents.

Legal requirements

  • Stinking passion flower is not a prohibited or restricted invasive plant under the Biosecurity Act 2014. However, by law, everyone has a general biosecurity obligation (GBO) to take reasonable and practical steps to minimise the risks associated with invasive plants and animals under their control.
  • Local governments must have a biosecurity plan that covers invasive plants and animals in their area. This plan may include actions to be taken on certain species. Some of these actions may be required under local laws. Contact your local government for more information.

Further information