Guideline 33: High risk community and commercial public events

Liquor Act 1992 - Sections 3, 101 to 103F & 107C

This guideline is issued in accordance with Section 42A of the Liquor Act 1992.

From 1 January 2009 the first object of the Liquor Act 1992is 'to regulate the liquor industry in a way compatible with minimising harm caused by alcohol abuse and misuse'. The exercise of this obligation by the Commissioner for Liquor and Gaming is rarely more relevant than when considering the implications of potential alcohol related harm at major events, especially those targeted at a youth demographic.

Application of the guideline

This guideline applies to all community liquor permits, commercial public event permits as well as temporary increases, temporary changes of conditions and similar applications for existing licensed premises. For example, a race track (whose principal activity is related to racing activities) that changes their normal activities for an event to conduct a music festival or similar event.

In making decisions about the conduct of high-risk community and commercial public events lodged after the implementation of the guideline, the Commissioner will not only consider the proposed conduct of the actual event but must also consider the wider implications of the irresponsible supply and consumption of liquor and its impact on public safety and the wider community.

For commercial public event permits the Commissioner must also have regard to the considerations detailed in Section 103(1) of the Liquor Act 1992.

Risk factors

In considering whether an event is to be deemed high risk, the Commissioner will have regard to a range of factors which may include:

Length and time of the event
  • events with liquor sales over 5 hours
  • events outside of ordinary trading hours (before 10.00am or after 12 midnight).
Age demographic
  • where the expected age demographic includes a high percentage of 18 to 25 year old patrons.
Type and nature of the event
  • some concerts
  • some sporting events
  • music festivals
  • whether the event is a community or commercial event.
Patron numbers
  • events where overall attendance at the event is expected to exceed 2000 persons on any day
  • events where greater than 50% of patrons are expected to consume liquor.
Compliance history of the event, event promoter, licensee or similar event
  • where significant breaches, safety, health, noise or patron behaviour issues have been identified in or around previous similar events or previous events conducted by related parties.
All ages or under-age events
  • whether the event organiser allows entry to unaccompanied minors
  • whether the event is 18+ only
  • whether the licensee intends to restrict liquor consumption to a defined 18+ area only
  • does granting a liquor permit for the event increase the risk of secondary supply of liquor to minors within the event site?
Consumption areas
  • total consumption areas exceeding 2000 square metres
  • the number of separate consumption areas
  • how consumption areas are defined.
Noise and amenity
  • whether the granting of a liquor permit for the event is likely to create unreasonable noise or amenity impact in, and around, the event site.

The Commissioner may also have regard to other factors in addition to those listed above being guided and informed by the stakeholder consultation, event planning and risk assessment process.

Conditions for high-risk events

If permission is granted under Sections 101 to 103F and 107C of the Liquor Act the Commissioner may impose standard conditions for high-risk events as well as any event or site specific conditions considered necessary during the event planning process.

The following list of conditions is not exhaustive and does not mean that each of the conditions will be imposed. Each event will be considered on its merits and consideration will be given to the imposition of those conditions from the list considered most appropriate to the circumstances of the event on a case-by-case basis.

Event planning

  • Where the licensee or permittee is not the event organiser, the licensee or permittee must ensure the event organiser attends and participates in any briefing arranged by the Office of Liquor and Gaming Regulation (OLGR) or Queensland Police Services (QPS) prior to the event.
  • Where the licensee or permittee is not the event organiser, the licensee or permittee must ensure the event organiser attends and participates in any debriefing arranged by OLGR or the police following the event.
  • The licensee or permittee must attend and participate in any debriefing arranged by OLGR or the police following the event.

Event management

The licensee must ensure an approved manager, as defined under the Liquor Act is present at the licensed premises at all times during the event.

The licensee must advise in the event management plan who the nominated approved manager for the event is and their contact telephone number.

The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure an appropriate system of lighting is implemented and remains in place for the duration of the event.

Harm minimisation

  • The licensee, permittee and approved managers must ensure that liquor for sale at the premises is restricted to the following products:
    • liquor other than wine (including medium and low strength beer, cider and pre-mixed spirits) where the alcohol content by volume is 4 percent or less and
    • wine with a maximum single serve of 100mL in a glass or plastic receptacle or 200mL in a piccolo.
  • Disposable drink containers only are to be used in any public area of the permitted premises.
  • No glass is permitted in any public area of the licensed premises. Exemptions may be considered where a fine dining area or corporate facilities are offered within the event area.
  • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure tap or drinking water is readily available and provided at no cost to patrons within the permitted area. The availability of such water is to be promoted.
  • The restriction on the sale and supply of liquor to a certain number of drinks per person will be assessed on each individual application.  In proposing such a condition, a graduated reduction in the number of drinks supplied to a person may be endorsed. For example:
    • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure the sale and supply of liquor is restricted to four alcoholic beverages only per person between the trading hours of <hours stated>.
    • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure the sale and supply of liquor is restricted to two alcoholic beverages only per person from to cessation of trade.
  • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure 100% of staff involved in the sale or supply of liquor have a current RSA training course certificate.

Minors

Events that target or allow for under-age or all age groups are considered as higher risk and, as such, specific conditions may be imposed, including:

  • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure the licensed areas of the event are adequately defined to ensure minors cannot obtain entry to permitted bar and consumption areas and that liquor is not removed from the permitted areas.
  • Minors are not allowed in the permitted areas of the event under any circumstances.
  • All persons over the age of 18 attending the event, must wear, at all times, a coloured wristband supplied by the permittee.

Crowd controllers

  • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure crowd controllers licensed under the Security Providers Act 1993 are employed in the following ratios at all times:
    • 1 to 1000 patrons or part thereof - 7 crowd controllers
    • Also at least 1 crowd controller for every 250 patrons or part thereafter or as otherwise determined.
  • A minimum of 2 crowd controllers licensed under the Security Providers Act must maintain surveillance outside the event area for a period of 1 hour after the event concludes or until all patrons have vacated the vicinity of the premises.
  • The licensee, permittee and approved manager must ensure an incident register is maintained where written details of all incidents that occur at the premises involving a patron being removed or a person being injured are recorded.
  • For the purpose of this condition the details must include the date and time of the incident, where the incident occurred, full description of persons involved (including names where obtainable) and reasons for the removal and any details of injuries incurred by any person. All removals are to be recorded regardless of the reason for removal. Where closed-circuit television recordings are made of such incidents in any part of the event area they must be kept for a minimum period of 28 days and must be produced immediately on request by an investigator or police officer.

Re-issued 24 January 2013
(Issued 5 August 2009, re-issued 15 October 2009)

Also consider...

Contact

General enquiries 13 QGOV (13 74 68)

  • Licence and permit enquiries

OLGRlicensing@justice.qld.gov.au

  • Gaming compliance enquiries

gamingcompliance@justice.qld.gov.au

  • Liquor compliance enquiries

liquorcompliance@justice.qld.gov.au

  • Media enquiries (07) 3872 0920

OLGRMedia@justice.qld.gov.au