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Jungle myna

Native to India and South-East Asia, the jungle myna is a medium-sized, black-grey bird with white wing patches. It is a pest that damages orchards and plantation crops in Singapore, Taiwan, Fiji and Western Samoa. Jungle mynas can also compete with native bird species.

The jungle myna is currently absent from Queensland but has the potential to become a significant pest here, like the Indian myna, to which it is closely related.

The jungle myna is not a prohibited or restricted invasive animal under the Biosecurity Act 2014.

Scientific name

Acridotheres fuscus

Similar species

Description

  • Medium-sized bird about 23cm long.
  • Wings have white patches that are obvious in flight.
  • Body is black-grey.
  • Eyes, beak, legs are yellow.
  • Males and females are similar, juveniles are browner.

Habitat

  • Found in open, disturbed sites such as cropping lands, orchards, fields, grasslands and urban areas.
  • Prefers tropical and subtropical habitats.

Distribution

  • Currently absent from Queensland.

Life cycle

  • Usually has 2 successive broods each year.
  • Tends to nest in colonies.
  • Normally lays 3–6 eggs.
  • Nests are often close to water or rice fields.

Crops affected

  • Groundnuts, various fruit crops.

Affected animals

  • Native birds

Impacts

Environmental

  • Can compete with native bird species.

Economic

  • Damages orchards and other plantation crops.

Social

  • Can be a nuisance in urban areas.

Control

  • Early detection is essential for preventing pest establishment. If you have seen or are in possession of a jungle myna contact Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23.

Legal requirements

  • The jungle myna is not a prohibited or restricted invasive animal under the Biosecurity Act 2014. However, by law, everyone has a general biosecurity obligation (GBO) to take reasonable and practical steps to minimise the risks associated with invasive plants and animals under their control.
  • Local governments must have a biosecurity plan that covers invasive plants and animals in their area. This plan may include actions to be taken on certain species. Some of these actions may be required under local laws. Contact your local government for more information.

Further information