Transporting dangerous goods for personal or 'tools of trade' use

You may be allowed to transport by road certain quantities of dangerous goods used as 'tools of trade' or for personal use without a dangerous goods driver licence or vehicle licence. For example, a pool owner may transport pool chlorine home from the supermarket, a painter may transport paints used in the course of their business, or a salesperson may transport chemical samples as part of their job.

Even when you carry certain quantities, it is still important that you ensure packages are loaded, secured, segregated, transported and unloaded safely. The packaging also must remain fit for the purpose of transporting dangerous goods and not be altered or damaged.

The following table lists the most common dangerous goods that are used for personal use and as 'tools of trade', and can be carried in a passenger compartment or enclosed space of a passenger vehicle. You do not require a dangerous goods vehicle or driver licence to transport the items listed in this table:

Example of the dangerous goods

Dangerous goods class

Total allowable amounts

LPG cylinders

Class 2
(Gases)

No more than 50L (or 2 x 9kg bottles)

Paint and paint products (including lacquer, enamel, stain, varnish and paint thinners)

Class 3 (Flammable liquids)

Up to 250L

Fuel in jerry cans

Class 3 (Flammable liquids)

Up to 250L

Waterproofing products and corrosive cleaning products

Class 8 (Corrosive substances)

Up to 250L

Swimming pool products (including acid and chlorine)

Class 5 (Oxidising substances and Organic peroxides)

Up to 250L

Dangerous goods carried outside the passenger compartment of a vehicle

You can transport a total quantity of dangerous goods of less than 500L or 500kg that does not include any dangerous goods from:

  • United Nations (UN) division 2.1 (other than aerosols)
  • UN division 2.3
  • or
  • packing group I (substances presenting high danger).

You can transport a total quantity of dangerous goods of less than 250L or 250kg that does include dangerous goods from:

  • UN division 2.1 (other than aerosols)
  • UN division 2.3*
  • or
  • packing group I*.

* The dangerous goods of UN division 2.3 and packing group I must together form less than 100L or 100kg of the total quantity.

Read more about dangerous goods divisions and packing groups, or review chapter 3.2 of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code for a complete list of dangerous goods.

Division 1 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Dangerous Goods) Regulation 2018 contains more information about the special provisions for tools of trade and dangerous goods for private use.

Dangerous goods that must not be transported in a passenger compartment of a vehicle

Dangerous goods of classes 3, 4, 5 or 6 that together form more than 250L or 250kg of the total quantity of dangerous goods in the load, must not be transported in a passenger compartment of a vehicle or enclosed space not separated from the passenger compartment of a vehicle.

Dangerous goods of divisions 2.1, 2.3 or packing group I that together form more than 50L or 50kg of the total quantity of the dangerous goods in the load, must not be transported in a passenger compartment of a vehicle, or in any other enclosed space in a vehicle.

Read more about dangerous goods divisions and packing groups, or review chapter 3.2 of the Australian Dangerous Goods Code for a complete list of dangerous goods.

Division 1 of the Transport Operations (Road Use Management—Dangerous Goods) Regulation 2018 contains more information about the special provisions for tools of trade and dangerous goods for private use.

Transporting diesel

You don't need a dangerous goods driver licence when only transporting diesel.

In Australia, any amount of diesel transported on its own by road is not classified as a dangerous good for transport purposes.

You will need a dangerous goods driver licence when diesel is transported together with Class 3 (flammable liquids) in compartments of a multiple compartment portable tank or tank vehicle. The load then becomes a refined petroleum product dangerous good and is identified under the name of Petroleum Products (UN1270).

For more information, refer to the Australian Dangerous Goods Code, or contact the Department of Transport and Main Roads at dgu@tmr.qld.gov.au.

Interstate contacts

Contact an interstate competent authority for information on dangerous goods regulations, licensing and classifications outside of Queensland.

Contact

General enquiries 13 QGOV (13 74 68)