Takeaway alcohol sales for off-premises consumption during coronavirus (COVID-19)

Under current conditions, you may have a limited number of patrons at your licensed premises and offer takeaway alcohol.

Bottle shops must still operate in compliance with the Liquor Act 1992 and any other government requirements. All licensed premises should have a system of control in place to ensure the responsible service of alcohol and that sales are not made to minors or intoxicated persons.

You should remind your patrons who purchase takeaway alcohol from your venue that in Queensland drinking alcohol in a public place is illegal and on-the-spot fines apply. The only exceptions are 'wet areas' designated by a local council, normally for particular occasions such as a wedding in a park.

Access coronavirus-related venue signage.

There is no restriction in the Liquor Act for advertising for takeaway alcohol or alcohol ordered online or by phone. But you cannot use unacceptable practices or promotions that encourage irresponsible consumption.

Takeaway sales for each licence type

The following explains under what conditions you can sell takeaway liquor, based on the type of licence you hold.

Commercial hotel licence

This licence can operate takeaway liquor sale areas that are detached from the licensed venue, or within or attached to the licensed venue.

Community club licence

This licence can sell takeaway liquor from the licensed venue.

Sales must be limited to members,reciprocal members, guests of these people and bonafide visitors to the club.

Subsidiary on-premises licences - cafés and restaurants

These licences can only sell takeaway alcohol consisting only of packaged beer (bottled or canned), wine, cider and ready-to-drink beverages, such as premixed spirits,  when sold together with a takeaway food order.

A maximum of 2.25 litres of alcohol (total volume) can only be sold per transaction.

For restaurants, 1 opened and unopened bottle of wine can be sold for takeaway to dine-in patrons, as normal.

Commercial other - bar licence

Takeaway alcohol sold with this licence can only consist of packaged beer (bottled or canned), wine, distilled spirits, cider and ready-to-drink beverages, such as premixed spirits.

A maximum of 2.25 litres of alcohol (total volume) can only be sold per transaction including a 750ml limit on distilled spirits within the total volume of any transaction.

Producer/wholesaler licence

If you are a craft brewer or artisanal distiller, you can sell takeaway alcohol produced on your licensed premises, provided you are either:

  • a craft brewer who produces between 2,500 litres and 5 million litres of product per year
  • an artisanal distiller who produces between 400 litres and 450,000 litres of product per year.

You can also sell your own products in person, by phone or online for home delivery, as long as you meet these production requirements.

If you also hold a brewery licence under the Excise Act 1901 (Cwlth), you can offer takeaway sales of your own product without having to meet the above production volumes.

Wine producer/merchant licence

This licence can provide takeaway wine at the licensed premises (including approved satellite cellar doors) or online.

Community other licence

This licence can provide takeaway food and alcohol to members, staff and reciprocal members.

Takeaway alcohol can only consist of packaged beer (bottled or canned), wine, distilled spirits, cider and ready-to-drink beverages, such as premixed spirits.

A maximum of 2.25 litres of liquor (total volume) can only be sold per transaction including a 750ml limit of distilled spirits within the total volume of any transaction.

Nightclub licence

This licence can only sell excess stock of pre-packaged alcohol, if approved by OLGR.

Restricted liquor permit (excluding those in an area subject to an alcohol management plan)

This licence can provide takeaway alcohol to members, staff and reciprocal members to allow for disposal of existing stock only.

Takeaway alcohol can only consist of packaged beer (bottled or canned), wine, distilled spirits, cider and ready-to-drink beverages, such as premixed spirits.

A maximum of 2.25 litres of liquor (total volume) can only be sold per transaction including a 750ml limit of distilled spirits within the total volume of any transaction.

Sales through third-party sites

Customers can't order alcohol through a third-party – only liquor licensees have the authority to sell or supply alcohol. All orders must be made with you, but you can have a third-party deliver it.

Third-party drivers don't need to be responsible service of alcohol (RSA) certified, but still need to obey the laws regarding the supply of alcohol to minors or to a person showing signs of intoxication.

Refilling growlers, squealers or other containers

Licensees can choose to accept customers' vessels, such as growlers or squealers, to refill.

Licensed venues across Queensland are defined as a food business under the Food Act 2006 and are required to comply with the Food Standards Code. This includes ensuring equipment is cleaned and sanitised to minimise the transmission of infectious disease and to protect food from contamination.

Licensees are responsible for ensuring they comply with these standards if they do accept growlers for refill.

In Queensland, enforcement of the Food Standards Code is a joint responsibility of Queensland Health and local government. Licensees who are not already aware of their obligations should contact these agencies for more information.

Search the local government directory and read about more about food safety regulations.

Contact

General enquiries 13 QGOV (13 74 68)

  • Licence and permit enquiries

1300 072 322
OLGRlicensing@justice.qld.gov.au

  • Gaming compliance enquiries

gamingcompliance@justice.qld.gov.au

  • Liquor compliance enquiries

liquorcompliance@justice.qld.gov.au

  • Media enquiries (07) 3738 8556

OLGRMedia@justice.qld.gov.au