Laws on baits, blooding or coursing and animals injuring other animals

Queensland animal welfare laws protect animals from being baited or harmed or killed by another animal.

Baits or harmful substances

It is an offence under the Animal Care and Protection Act 2001 to administer, feed or lay a bait, or a harmful or poisonous substance, with the intention of injuring or killing an animal.

The maximum penalty for an individual convicted of these offences is $39,165 or 1 year imprisonment.

Some people are exempt from this law, including:

  • a person who is authorised under the Health Act 1937 to administer substances to an animal, provided it is killed humanely
  • those killing feral or pest animals. This exemption applies only if the act is done in a way that causes the animal as little pain as is reasonable and complies with any regulations.

If you are unsure if your intended use of poisons or other harmful substances is legal, contact Biosecurity Queensland or the RSPCA's complaints coordinator for advice.

Allowing an animal to injure or kill another animal

Under certain circumstances, it is an offence under the Act for someone in control of an animal to allow it to injure or kill another animal.

The maximum penalty for an individual convicted of this offence is $39,165 or 1 year imprisonment.

For information on what 'unlawfully allowing to injure or kill' means, see section 37 of the Act.

Keeping or using an animal for blooding or coursing

There is a specific offence under the Act for a person keeping or using an animal for blooding or coursing. The maximum fine is $39,165 or 1 year imprisonment. The fine may be up to 5 times this amount for corporations. There are also offences for severe animal cruelty under the Criminal Code Act 1899 which have a maximum penalty of 7 years imprisonment.

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