Coronavirus (COVID-19) update: We are currently updating information following recent Queensland and Australian Government announcements. Find assistance and support for coronavirus affected businesses and industries.

About African swine fever

African swine fever is an infectious viral disease of domestic and feral pigs. People cannot be infected. African swine fever can result in a very high mortality rate in infected pigs and no vaccine or treatment is available. Australia is free from African swine fever however if it were introduced to Australia, it would significantly impact pig health and production.

Overseas travellers

The greatest risk of introduction is from people illegally bringing pork or pork products into Australia from overseas and the products being fed to or eaten by pigs.

Australia does not import fresh pork and the Australian Government has strengthened requirements for importing pork products from countries with African swine fever.

You can help reduce the risk of African swine fever being introduced by complying with the requirements for what can and can't be brought into Australia.

Food that must not be fed to pigs

Some foods increase the risk of spreading disease and should never be fed to pigs. Household, commercial or industrial waste that contain or have come in contact with meat or meat products is illegal and should not be fed to your pigs.

Pig keepers and farmers

Australia is free from African swine fever. Pig owners should take action now to protect their pigs against the risk of African swine fever.

Pig hunters

It's important to remain alert for African swine fever as this serious disease of pigs continues to spread in neighbouring countries. Queensland's widespread population of feral pigs presents a challenge.

Veterinarians

The African swine fever virus is a complex, large, enveloped DNA virus.

It is currently classified as the only member of the Asfarviridae family, genus Asfivirus. The virus is stable at a wide range of pH levels and can remain viable for long periods in blood, faeces and tissues, particularly in chilled and frozen meat.

African swine fever can present as peracute, acute, subacute and chronic forms.

Find more detailed information for veterinarians to assist in the diagnosis and control of this disease.

Reporting suspected African swine fever infection

Early detection and reporting of African swine fever is critical to stopping the spread of this disease.

If you suspect your pets, farmed pigs or feral pigs have African swine fever, you must report it to Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23 or contact the Emergency Disease Watch Hotline on 1800 675 888.